June Redux 2014 – FIN

In June 2014 this was the final submission of my ‘The 100’ series that I began in 2012 in celebration of my 100th post on WP.

Over a two-year span I posted 100 Text and Art artworks, this creative form being at the heart of my blog.

My intention was to present 100 pieces of text based art from historical and contemporary artists, from my ex students and from my own hand.

With this post it was done

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completed, concluded, fulfilled,

finished and finalized.

 

Remember the endings of those romantic,

enigmatic, exotic and erotic

French movies?

~FIN~

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Time to put on hats and coats,

shuffle through popcorn detritus and cola cans,

leave the cosy sentiments of make-believe,

the warmth of shared fantasies and holding hands,

the smells of perfume, upholstery and sweat,

and stumble through swinging doors

into the glare and noises of the street,

stunned for a moment, floating between

two worlds,

 uncertain which is real.

 

fin_2

 

art and poem by clinock

April Redux – 2013 – fragmented/enchanted

fragmented-enchanted

Even as the center holds,

various preconceptions

of mirrored identity,

(sensible face,

pedestrian limbs,

imagined organs),

fragment and

peel away,

shedding more than was known.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Enchanted by fragmentation

I’m reluctant to leave

this sweet and bitter place

where honeyed magics

wing through space,

pollinating thought

and flesh, and dreams.

Waiting becomes me.

I paint the walls with lightning.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Fragmented by enchantment,

a cellular accommodation

reforms my reformation

in a dance of Buddha love,

an attitude of slow turning

across the wavering tiles,

where I shape and shape again

the slow dissolve

of the waiting room I was.

 

 

photo collage and poem by clinock

Trucker (renovation art 4)

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Sculpture: Trucker, by Clinock. H. 8″ x W. 3″ x D. 6″. Fired and stained clay / collaged toy truck.

keep on truckin'

 

Deja vu – map of my heart

mapheart

In case I disappear this is a map of my heart,

(should you care that is to seek my whereabouts)

a patched up job, repeatedly reassembled,

it beats to the rhythm of a thousand suns,

stronger than a life is long.

Please do not fold, spindle or mutilate.

 

Notice how the blue of fallen sky becomes a sea

where angels and mermaids dance in arcs of light.

I rest on these beaches when I lose myself,

cool my body in the waves and drift away.

This is the path back home.

This is the country where I find myself again.

 

Map of My Heart. 23 x 17″ (varies). Acrylic on torn and glued papers, by clinock

poem by clinock

edited redux 2014

Beat Mashup – High School Drag

high school confidential

mixed media collage by clinock

thanks to youtube for movie clip

Beat Mashup – Kerouac and Jazz

Road Rose

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Video thanks to You Tube / Photo of Jack Kerouac thanks to Google Images

Mixed media art by clinock.

MASHUP – Jacques Villegle @the VAG

portrait-villegle

Extract from VAG’s write up on Jacques Villegle:

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“The idea was really to take what was out there in the street and basically just select a section of it and frame it. All the work was really done by someone else, time passing, or the weather.”

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“In the 1930s, the poster was called the “journal (newspaper) of the street,” something that really reflected society. And what I think I realized at the time was that the posters, as an art form, were always going to evolve and so there would always be something new to explore. In the 1950s for example, photography was not used in posters, it was still drawings.”

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A keen observer of urban art and society, each of his works bears the name of the street where the poster was collected. For Villeglé the posters are as much witnesses as they are actors in their environment, and while he makes the choice of framing the final image, he is completely absent from the actual execution of the works, which have been created by an anonymous collective, which is why he describes his ripped posters as “lacères anonymes.”

Rues Saint Georges Saint Lazare

Credits: All images, except the first and last, and all descriptors were photographed at the Vancouver Art Gallery (VAG) by clinock. Thanks to the VAG.

The first and last images thanks to Google Images.

Villegle quotes in italics and final write-up on the artist thanks to http://www.blouinartinfo.com